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7 Holiday Gigs to Put a Jingle in Your Pocket

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This story originally appeared on The Penny Hoarder.Are you a Christmas superfan who can’t get enough of Santa, snowmen, holiday music — and even holiday Muzak?
Or are you staring at your gift list, synthesizer version of “Sleigh Bells Ring” playing in the background, and feeling, well, broke?
A seasonal side gig may be just the thing to get you through December with your spirit and finances intact. Here are several Christmas jobs and holiday-related gigs to put some extra jingle in your pocket.

1. Sell baked goods
B Calkins / Shutterstock.com
If you love to bake, this season is your time to shine. Most everyone loves to indulge in extra delights around Christmas, (Calories? Who’s counting?)
But let’s be real: Baking is time-consuming, it’s hard work, and it’s easy to mess up.
You can rescue your neighbors, your co-workers and your area farmers market shoppers with ready-made treats. Read how to earn money selling your baked goods.
2. Deck someone else’s halls
Syda Productions / Shutterstock.com
Decorating is a little like baking in that it’s fun, yes, but it’s also a chore. (Yeah, we said it.)
Getting up on a ladder to hang lights, untangling said lights, stringing them across the eaves only to realize you’ve run out of cord — it’s a jolly good time until you’re actually doing it.
That’s where the savvy seasonal side-hustler comes in.
Market yourself for Christmas decorator jobs around your neighborhood or on a platform like TaskRabbit or Craigslist, offering up your services of hanging Christmas lights, trimming trees, and even wrapping gifts.
You could also find a gig with a professional decorating company.
3. Get a retail job
Robert Kneschke / Shutterstock.com
Big retailers are hiring seasonal workers by the thousands. And thanks to the low rate of unemployment, they’re having to compete with each other for workers to fill the gigs. That means better pay and benefits.
The Penny Hoarder has tallied some 550,000 Christmas job openings at major employers around the country. Check out these tips for getting hired during this competitive hiring season.
If you want a side gig that could last into the new year, tax prep specialists Jackson Hewitt are staffing up for the 2021 tax season.
4. Befriend a senior
fizkes / Shutterstock.com
With social distancing keeping families apart this holiday season, there are plenty of seniors who may be feeling isolated and in need of a little extra help.
Papa, a company that pairs older adults with young people to combat isolation and loneliness, ramped up its services and hiring as the pandemic hit.
While the company operates mainly in 25 states, candidates can apply from anywhere in the United States and assist virtually with companionship, tech troubleshooting, and more.

5. Sell your homemade holiday crafts
maicasaa / Shutterstock.com
You can warm yourself in the holiday spirit, exercise your artsy side, and make a little money all at once by making and selling Christmas crafts.
Pinterest runneth over with ideas. Here are a few of our favorites.
6. Shovel snow
Chiyaca / Shutterstock.com
Think of this as your holiday income stream and your winter workout regimen to keep the December weight gain at bay. Win-win!
Shovler is an app, much like Uber, that connects willing shovelers with buried driveways. (Actually, the owners of said driveways.) You shovel, they pay.
7. Take family portraits
Dean Drobot / Shutterstock.com
If you’ve got a good eye and a better-than-decent camera, you can offer your services shooting those ubiquitous holiday family photos of everyone in matching plaid pajamas.
If you can think of an original image, all the better. And if you can get all the kids to smile at once, please, please share your secret fairy dust because we’ve literally never pulled that off.
Here’s what you need to start making money taking family photos.

Disclosure: The information you read here is always objective. However, we sometimes receive compensation when you click links within our stories.

How to Become a Freelancer: The Ultimate Guide

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This story originally appeared on FlexJobs.com.The reasons to embrace a freelance career are compelling. From supplementing your income to setting your own hours, freelance work is increasingly moving from the fringes of the job marketplace and into the mainstream.
If you’ve considered freelancing, you’re not alone. A recent study found that over one-third of workers (36%) are currently freelancing, an increase of 22% since 2019.
If you’re looking to become a freelancer, we’ve put together this detailed guide to help you get started!
A freelancer is not an employee. The IRS defines an employee as someone who:
Is not in charge of deciding when, where and how they work.
Does not choose how much they are paid or what their raises or bonuses are.
Is reimbursed for job-related expenses and receives benefits (like health insurance).
A freelancer, on the other hand, is almost the exact opposite of an employee. Freelancers:
Can choose who they want to work for, when they work and where they work with few exceptions.
Set their payment rates.
Do not receive any benefits from whomever they work for.
To learn more about what freelancing is all about, read:
Although the idea of being your own boss may sound exciting to you, freelancing is not for everyone. It takes more than an entrepreneurial spirit to become a freelancer. Before learning how to start a freelance business, it’s important to consider the pros and cons of freelancing.
The pros include:
Choosing who you do and don’t work for (along with when and for how long)
Working on only the projects you really want to do
Flexibility
Exposure — you learn a lot about different industries
The cons are:
You’re responsible for paying all of your taxes
No benefits
The work isn’t always steady, which can lead to cash-flow issues
Isolation — you’re almost always working alone
This is why it might be best to begin freelancing when you’re still employed at a full-time job. This will allow you to test the waters and get a better understanding of how being a freelancer works.
Prospective freelancers spend much of their time (at least at first) looking for work. For instance, writers may query various publications with ideas for articles they’d like to write. A freelance web designer might contact area businesses to see if any need help with their sites.
Building relationships and providing quality work makes securing future “gigs” easier through repeat business, word-of-mouth and stellar recommendations. There are also job websites that fully vet and verify all of their freelance opportunities (like FlexJobs) so that you can have a safe and productive job search.
For more ideas on finding freelance work, read “How to Find Freelance Work: Tips, Red Flags, and More”
Following are some tips for becoming a freelancer.

Do your homework

marvent / Shutterstock.com
Before you set up your website, order business cards, and hang out your shingle, start with some market research to make sure there’s a demand for whatever field you’re in and to understand the competition.
This can help you determine how and where to market your services. Check out your competition to see what kinds of services they offer and how much they charge. You don’t want to overcharge potential clients, but you don’t want to undercharge and devalue your worth, either.
Create a brand

miya227 / Shutterstock.com
Securing work in a crowded freelance field can be challenging. A strong personal brand can help you stand out and be memorable.
What distinctive blend of attributes and abilities do you bring to the table? Thinking about what you have to offer and who might benefit from your services will lead you in the right direction when trying to market yourself.
Plan ahead

goodluz / Shutterstock.com
Many freelancers go through feast-or-famine cycles, especially when they are starting out. Sometimes they have so much work to do they aren’t sure they can get it all done. And other times, crickets.
Part of understanding how to start a freelance business includes building up a nest egg to ease some of the stress when work is scarce. To become a successful freelancer, learn how to incorporate finding future work into your daily schedule — even while finishing up assignments at hand.
Plan for routine paperwork

Phovoir / Shutterstock.com
While passion for your work is certainly necessary to establish a thriving freelance career, so is the ability to handle other duties. Major responsibilities include securing health insurance, planning for retirement and paying self-employment taxes. You’ll also need to take care of day-to-day operations, such as ordering office supplies, invoicing, time tracking, and maintaining relationships with customers.
For more advice on how to handle the administrative side of your freelance business, read:
Get a mentor

marvent / Shutterstock.com
Finding a mentor is a solid way to learn the ins and outs of freelancing from someone who has either been there or has enough knowledge about how the freelance business works to help you out.

Connect with a community

fizkes / Shutterstock.com
Even though you may be a one-person business, you don’t have to go it alone. Local and professional organizations, as well as online groups, can answer questions about how to start a freelance business, be sounding boards for ideas, and connect you to a world beyond your home office.
Joining a group of like-minded people (like a writer’s group, for example) is a great way to get feedback and grow your skills with people who share in your goal to be the best you can be at your job.
For more tips on connecting with other freelancers and growing your network, check out “12 Networking Tips for Freelancers.”
Start small

marvent / Shutterstock.com
When you are thinking about how to start a freelance business, start small. While it would be ideal to have a cluster of clients, start with one or two.
Consider starting your freelance business as a side hustle first. This gives you the freedom to start small without having to worry about generating an income or keeping your health insurance.
By alleviating some of the pressure and giving yourself permission to go small, you’ll be more inclined to find a steady stream of clients organically instead of worrying about freelance famine. In turn, you can focus on producing great work that will help you impress your current clients, which can then help you find more new clients.
Spread the word

fizkes / Shutterstock.com
No one will know you’re freelancing unless you spread the word. So talk to friends and family first to see if you can get any job referrals from them. Then branch out to your social media circles, being sure not to mix your personal life with your professional one.
If you’ve left past jobs on good terms, it may not hurt to reach out to former employers and let them know that you’re open for business. You’re familiar with the company and likely know their niche better than most, so it could be a win-win scenario.
Ask for referrals

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One of the smartest things you can do to get started as a freelancer is to set up solid networking connections, including people who can give you great referrals. Potential references to consider are past work colleagues, present colleagues, and even friends. Any and all of these people can help connect you to clients in need of your services.
Protect yourself

PORTRAIT IMAGES ASIA BY NONWARIT / Shutterstock.com
There are many horror stories out there from freelancers who didn’t get paid for all their hard freelance work. Be sure to protect yourself with a freelance contract.
Having a written contract in place is no guarantee that you’ll get paid. But a contract is something to fall back on in the event you aren’t paid and have to take your client to court.
Build your recommendations

Mongkol Foto / Shutterstock.com
Everyone wants their hard work to be acknowledged and praised. When you work for an employer, that praise generally comes in the form of positive employee evaluations, raises, and bonuses. When you’re a freelancer, though, praise comes in the form of a client recommendation.
When you’ve finished the job, ask your client to leave a review on your website, or recommend you on LinkedIn. These positive reviews from actual clients can help raise your profile, establish you as a professional expert, and help you find new clients.
Stay motivated

By Flamingo Images / Shutterstock.com
Every job has its good days and bad days. Freelancing is no different. However, if you lose your motivation as a freelancer, you may lose your whole business!
Freelancer burnout is real. It might be because you took on too many projects or because you have a hard time maintaining boundaries. Whatever it is, burnout can cause you to lose motivation.
Learn when to say no

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As your freelance business starts growing, it can be tempting to take on every new project that comes your way. But this might not be the best idea. Taking on more than you can handle only means you’ll be more likely to turn in subpar work that isn’t up to your (or your client’s) standards.
Instead, be thoughtful in the work you decide to do and be as sure as you can that whatever your workload, you can turn everything in on time.
Using FlexJobs to become a freelancer

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Now that you know the ins and outs of becoming a successful freelancer, it’s time to land clients. That’s where we can help!
We post flexible and remote-friendly jobs in more than 50 career categories at companies that range from startups to Fortune 100 brands. Many freelancers have had success on our platform, and so can you!
Take the tour today and learn how FlexJobs can help you find freelance work.

Disclosure: The information you read here is always objective. However, we sometimes receive compensation when you click links within our stories.

15 Cities With the Most Physically Demanding Jobs

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This story originally appeared on Construction Coverage.The COVID-19 pandemic is responsible for the largest wave of job losses since the Great Depression. The mass layoffs caused by social distancing regulations have brought new meaning to the term “essential worker.”
Today’s essential workers often hold some of the most physically demanding jobs. According to data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, more than one-third of workers in protective service, construction, maintenance and repair engage in physically demanding activity.
Nationally, over 10% of all workers hold physically demanding jobs, defined here as jobs where workers engage in heavy or very heavy work activities. A large portion of those physically demanding jobs are in transportation and material moving, which employs over 12.5 million workers in the U.S. Construction occupations also account for a significant number of workers in physically demanding roles, with nearly 2.3 million construction workers engaging in heavy or very heavy work.
The employment and wage data used in this study are from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics 2019 Occupational Employment Statistics. Information on the physical demands of occupations is from the 2018 Occupational Requirements Survey. Specifically, researchers looked at the percentage of workers in each occupation where the strength requirement was either heavy or very heavy work.

To identify the percentage of workers in physically demanding jobs by location, strength requirement percentages were multiplied by each location’s occupation-specific employment numbers, summed, and then divided by the total employment for that location. Locations were ordered by the resulting statistic. In the event of a tie, the location with more total workers in physically demanding jobs was ranked higher.
Locations with a greater prevalence of physically demanding jobs tend to have lower overall wages. In locations where more than 10% of workers are in physically demanding jobs, the average median annual wage is slightly above $36,000. By comparison, the average median annual wage in locations where less than 10% of workers engage in physically demanding jobs is $41,000. Despite this trend, physically demanding jobs often require only a high school diploma or less. Adjusting for educational attainment, workers with physically demanding jobs actually tend to earn more than workers with similar education in different jobs.
Following are the metropolitan areas with the largest percentage of workers in physically demanding jobs.
15. Oklahoma City, OK
Natalia Bratslavsky / Shutterstock.com
Percentage of workers in physically demanding jobs: 10.4%
Total workers in physically demanding jobs: 64,924
Total workers across all jobs: 627,500
Protective service workers: 13,310
Construction workers: 36,090
Installation, maintenance, & repair workers: 27,240
Transportation & moving workers: 49,820
Median annual wage (all workers): $37,640
14. Nashville-Davidson–Murfreesboro–Franklin, TN
Sean Pavone / Shutterstock.com
Percentage of workers in physically demanding jobs: 10.4%
Total workers in physically demanding jobs: 104,147
Total workers across all jobs: 999,030
Protective service workers: 23,010
Construction workers: 34,390
Installation, maintenance, & repair workers: 39,690
Transportation & moving workers: 102,930
Median annual wage (all workers): $38,900
13. Jacksonville, FL
Sean Pavone / Shutterstock.com
Percentage of workers in physically demanding jobs: 10.5%
Total workers in physically demanding jobs: 73,877
Total workers across all jobs: 703,140
Protective service workers: 17,530
Construction workers: 32,850
Installation, maintenance, & repair workers: 31,340
Transportation & moving workers: 67,280
Median annual wage (all workers): $36,770
12. Cincinnati, OH-KY-IN
Doug Lemke / Shutterstock.com
Percentage of workers in physically demanding jobs: 10.5%
Total workers in physically demanding jobs: 114,206
Total workers across all jobs: 1,083,650
Protective service workers: 22,300
Construction workers: 36,770
Installation, maintenance, & repair workers: 43,250
Transportation & moving workers: 108,510
Median annual wage (all workers): $39,620
11. Charlotte-Concord-Gastonia, NC-SC
Jon Bilous / Shutterstock.com
Percentage of workers in physically demanding jobs: 10.6%
Total workers in physically demanding jobs: 132,596
Total workers across all jobs: 1,245,660
Protective service workers: 27,380
Construction workers: 55,170
Installation, maintenance, & repair workers: 51,630
Transportation & moving workers: 128,790
Median annual wage (all workers): $39,230

10. New Orleans-Metairie, LA
Joseph Sohm / Shutterstock.com
Percentage of workers in physically demanding jobs: 10.7%
Total workers in physically demanding jobs: 59,443
Total workers across all jobs: 557,190
Protective service workers: 18,640
Construction workers: 23,630
Installation, maintenance, & repair workers: 23,220
Transportation & moving workers: 47,990
Median annual wage (all workers): $35,620
9. Birmingham-Hoover, AL
Sean Pavone / Shutterstock.com
Percentage of workers in physically demanding jobs: 10.8%
Total workers in physically demanding jobs: 56,113
Total workers across all jobs: 518,210
Protective service workers: 13,710
Construction workers: 23,770
Installation, maintenance, & repair workers: 24,560
Transportation & moving workers: 41,190
Median annual wage (all workers): $38,020
8. Virginia Beach-Norfolk-Newport News, VA-NC
JoMo333 / Shutterstock.com
Percentage of workers in physically demanding jobs: 10.8%
Total workers in physically demanding jobs: 82,225
Total workers across all jobs: 758,420
Protective service workers: 21,040
Construction workers: 39,470
Installation, maintenance, & repair workers: 36,660
Transportation & moving workers: 63,780
Median annual wage (all workers): $38,960
7. Las Vegas-Henderson-Paradise, NV
sirtravelalot / Shutterstock.com
Percentage of workers in physically demanding jobs: 10.8%
Total workers in physically demanding jobs: 109,739
Total workers across all jobs: 1,019,890
Protective service workers: 35,240
Construction workers: 53,250
Installation, maintenance, & repair workers: 34,390
Transportation & moving workers: 88,500
Median annual wage (all workers): $35,660
6. Houston-The Woodlands-Sugar Land, TX
Nate Hovee / Shutterstock.com
Percentage of workers in physically demanding jobs: 11%
Total workers in physically demanding jobs: 335,896
Total workers across all jobs: 3,052,170
Protective service workers: 73,870
Construction workers: 193,950
Installation, maintenance, & repair workers: 133,010
Transportation & moving workers: 258,690
Median annual wage (all workers): $40,570
5. Indianapolis-Carmel-Anderson, IN
Semmick Photo / Shutterstock.com
Percentage of workers in physically demanding jobs: 11.1%
Total workers in physically demanding jobs: 116,880
Total workers across all jobs: 1,057,780
Protective service workers: 23,730
Construction workers: 42,030
Installation, maintenance, & repair workers: 40,200
Transportation & moving workers: 122,840
Median annual wage (all workers): $39,030
4. Grand Rapids-Wyoming, MI
Henryk Sadura / Shutterstock.com
Percentage of workers in physically demanding jobs: 11.6%
Total workers in physically demanding jobs: 66,085
Total workers across all jobs: 567,640
Protective service workers: 7,530
Construction workers: 19,100
Installation, maintenance, & repair workers: 24,720
Transportation & moving workers: 56,810
Median annual wage (all workers): $37,410
3. Louisville/Jefferson County, KY-IN
Thomas Kelley / Shutterstock.com
Percentage of workers in physically demanding jobs: 11.6%
Total workers in physically demanding jobs: 75,805
Total workers across all jobs: 656,250
Protective service workers: 12,410
Construction workers: 23,750
Installation, maintenance, & repair workers: 27,890
Transportation & moving workers: 82,040
Median annual wage (all workers): $37,460
2. Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, CA
MattGush / Shutterstock.com
Percentage of workers in physically demanding jobs: 12.3%
Total workers in physically demanding jobs: 188,989
Total workers across all jobs: 1,538,400
Protective service workers: 40,900
Construction workers: 82,200
Installation, maintenance, & repair workers: 59,480
Transportation & moving workers: 207,620
Median annual wage (all workers): $37,780
1. Memphis, TN-MS-AR
f11 photo / Shutterstock.com
Percentage of workers in physically demanding jobs: 12.6%
Total workers in physically demanding jobs: 79,900
Total workers across all jobs: 632,600
Protective service workers: 21,110
Construction workers: 18,330
Installation, maintenance, & repair workers: 23,300
Transportation & moving workers: 107,020
Median annual wage (all workers): $35,540

Disclosure: The information you read here is always objective. However, we sometimes receive compensation when you click links within our stories.

15 Cities With the Most Manufacturing Jobs

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This story originally appeared on Smartest Dollar.Since its peak in 1979, manufacturing employment in the U.S. has been on the decline, accelerating sharply around the turn of the century. Despite modest gains since 2010, the number of manufacturing jobs remains far below previous levels.
According to data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, as of 2019, just 8.5% of workers were employed in the manufacturing sector, totaling less than 13 million jobs.
The share of employment in manufacturing varies significantly across cities and states — some parts of the country depend much more on manufacturing work than others.

To find the metropolitan areas with the most manufacturing jobs, researchers at Smartest Dollar used employment data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The researchers ranked metro areas according to the share of workers employed in manufacturing. Researchers also looked at the percentage change in total manufacturing jobs since 1999 and the total number of manufacturing jobs in 2019 and 1999.
To improve relevance, only metropolitan areas with at least 100,000 people were included in the analysis.
Here are the large metropolitan areas with the largest share of workers employed in manufacturing.
15. Seattle
Sean Pavone / Shutterstock.com
Share of employment in manufacturing: 8.8%
Change in total manufacturing jobs since 1999: -19.1% (43,700 total jobs lost)
Total manufacturing jobs in 2019: 184,700
Total manufacturing jobs in 1999: 228,400
14. Chicago
f11photo / Shutterstock.com
Share of employment in manufacturing: 8.8%
Change in total manufacturing jobs since 1999: -35.3% (229,100 total jobs lost)
Total manufacturing jobs in 2019: 419,500
Total manufacturing jobs in 1999: 648,600
13. Charlotte, North Carolina
Kevin M. McCarthy / Shutterstock.com
Share of employment in manufacturing: 9.0%
Change in total manufacturing jobs since 1999: -29.3% (46,000 total jobs lost)
Total manufacturing jobs in 2019: 111,200
Total manufacturing jobs in 1999: 157,200
12. Buffalo, New York
Atomazul / Shutterstock.com
Share of employment in manufacturing: 9.3%
Change in total manufacturing jobs since 1999: -37.1% (30,900 total jobs lost)
Total manufacturing jobs in 2019: 52,400
Total manufacturing jobs in 1999: 83,300
11. Minneapolis
nikitsin.smugmug.com / Shutterstock.com
Share of employment in manufacturing: 9.9%
Change in total manufacturing jobs since 1999: -17.0% (41,200 total jobs lost)
Total manufacturing jobs in 2019: 200,700
Total manufacturing jobs in 1999: 241,900
10. Hartford, Connecticut
Sean Pavone / Shutterstock.com
Share of employment in manufacturing: 10.4%
Change in total manufacturing jobs since 1999: -21.0% (16,100 total jobs lost)
Total manufacturing jobs in 2019: 60,400
Total manufacturing jobs in 1999: 76,500

9. Rochester, New York
Sirichai netthong / Shutterstock.com
Share of employment in manufacturing: 10.5%
Change in total manufacturing jobs since 1999: -47.5% (51,100 total jobs lost)
Total manufacturing jobs in 2019: 56,500
Total manufacturing jobs in 1999: 107,600
8. Portland, Oregon
Josemaria Toscano / Shutterstock.com
Share of employment in manufacturing: 10.6%
Change in total manufacturing jobs since 1999: -8.9% (12,700 total jobs lost)
Total manufacturing jobs in 2019: 129,300
Total manufacturing jobs in 1999: 142,000
7. Cincinnati
Anne Kitzman / Shutterstock.com
Share of employment in manufacturing: 10.8%
Change in total manufacturing jobs since 1999: -18.8% (27,900 total jobs lost)
Total manufacturing jobs in 2019: 120,600
Total manufacturing jobs in 1999: 148,500
6. Cleveland
Pedro Gutierrez / Shutterstock.com
Share of employment in manufacturing: 11.4%
Change in total manufacturing jobs since 1999: -37.2% (73,000 total jobs lost)
Total manufacturing jobs in 2019: 123,500
Total manufacturing jobs in 1999: 196,500
5. Louisville, Kentucky
f11photo / Shutterstock.com
Share of employment in manufacturing: 12.3%
Change in total manufacturing jobs since 1999: -12.7% (12,100 total jobs lost)
Total manufacturing jobs in 2019: 83,000
Total manufacturing jobs in 1999: 95,100
4. Detroit
Harold Stiver / Shutterstock.com
Share of employment in manufacturing: 12.6%
Change in total manufacturing jobs since 1999: -30.6% (113,900 total jobs lost)
Total manufacturing jobs in 2019: 257,900
Total manufacturing jobs in 1999: 371,800
3. Milwaukee
f11photo / Shutterstock.com
Share of employment in manufacturing: 13.7%
Change in total manufacturing jobs since 1999: -28.4% (47,500 total jobs lost)
Total manufacturing jobs in 2019: 120,000
Total manufacturing jobs in 1999: 167,500
2. San Jose, California
stellamc / Shutterstock.com
Share of employment in manufacturing: 15.1%
Change in total manufacturing jobs since 1999: -26.6% (62,700 total jobs lost)
Total manufacturing jobs in 2019: 173,000
Total manufacturing jobs in 1999: 235,700
1. Grand Rapids, Michigan
Henryk Sadura / Shutterstock.com
Share of employment in manufacturing: 21.0%
Change in total manufacturing jobs since 1999: -9.0% (11,800 total jobs lost)
Total manufacturing jobs in 2019: 119,000
Total manufacturing jobs in 1999: 130,800

Disclosure: The information you read here is always objective. However, we sometimes receive compensation when you click links within our stories.


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