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Dolce & Gabbana Sues Two U.S. Bloggers for $600 Million

The lawsuit was filed in Milan civil court in 2019, but was just made public this week.
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March 8, 2021 3 min read

This article was translated from our Spanish edition using AI technologies. Errors may exist due to this process.

Milan fashion house Dolce & Gabbana has filed a defamation lawsuit in an Italian court and seeks more than $ 600 million in damages from two American bloggers.
The defendants are Tony Liu and Lindsay Schuyler , who run a fashion account on Instagram called ‘ Diet Prada’ . They both re-posted anti-Asian comments attributed to one of the Italian designers that led to a boycott of Asian consumers in 2018.
Why the lawsuit?
The case dates back to 2018, after a parade was promoted in Shanghai that were considered culturally insensitive. In addition to some leaks of comments from Stafano Gabbana that insulted the Asian market of a private chat on Instagram. The designer said it was a hack and they both apologized in a video to the Chinese people.

As a result, the show was canceled and retailers recalled the Dolce & Gabbana merchandise. So the Italian firm faced a boycott in Asia.
In 2019, the lawsuit was filed in the civil court of Milan, but the same bloggers made it public until now on their Instagram account.

Susan Scafidi, director of the Fashion Law Institute, a nonprofit organization representing bloggers, told The Associated Press : “This whole case is a way of trying to silence ‘Diet Prada’, and Tony and Lindsay personally. ”.
“A public apology and a silent demand really cancel each other out in my mind,” Scafidi added. The bloggers’ lawyers argue that the Italian court is not the appropriate place to carry out the process, since the defendants reside in the United States and the damages caused occurred in Asia.
Why is Dolce & Gabbana asking for $ 600 million?
The lawyer says that the Italian firm is asking for 600 million dollars, (or 500 million euros). Broken down in euros are: 450 million to restore the image of the brand since 2018, 3 million for the company and one million for the designer Stefano Gabbana, to whom the comments are attributed. Also, they ask for 8.6 million for the cancellation of the show in Shanghai, another 8.6 million for personnel expenses and 89.6 million for lost sales in Asia between November 2018 and March 2019.
‘Diet Prada’ are known in the fashion world for their cutting comments on the lack of originality in the designs and social issues. Now they’re in the middle of a GoFundMe fundraiser, carrying a little over $ 40,000.
What do you think? Is the measure taken by Dolce & Gabbana excessive?

Burger King Tweets “Women Belong in the Kitchen,” And Social Media Is on Fire

March 8, 2021 5 min read

This article was translated from our Spanish edition using AI technologies. Errors may exist due to this process.

Today, March 8, International Women’s Day is celebrated, commemorating the struggle of women for equal rights. In the interest of joining the commemoration, many brands speak out in favor of social movements, however, sometimes they do not do as well as they hope.
Within the framework of this day Burger King United Kingdom tweeted “women belong to the kitchen”, the tweet is accompanied by a thread with two more messages where the fast food company explains that it is launching a scholarship program to encourage female employees to pursue a culinary career and reduce the gender gap in this sector.

Women belong in the kitchen.
– Burger King (@BurgerKingUK) March 8, 2021
“We are on a mission to change the gender ratio in the restaurant industry by empowering female employees with the opportunity to pursue a culinary career,” she says in the following tweet.
However, many users were left with only the first message, yes, the one that says that ‘women belong to the kitchen’ and Twitter burned.
“Someone who works at Burger King saw this and really thought it was a good idea,” says a user of the social network.

somebody working at Burger King really looked at this and thought it was a good idea
– chop (@chopggs) March 8, 2021
“Shout out to Burger King for damaging what could have been a fabulous tweet on behalf of women because they couldn’t help but make an outdated joke that men often use. However, happy International Women’s Day: D, “commented Hannah Rutherford, youtuber and Twitch streamer.

Shoutout to Burger King for absolutely fucking what could have been a fabulous pro-women tweet because they couldn’t stop themselves making an outdated joke often used by men.Happy International Women’s Day though: D https://t.co/pr8PaJLgX3
– Hannah Rutherford (@lomadia) March 8, 2021
According to Fast Company , the message was adapted from a full-page ad in The New York Times , created by DAVID Miami agency for the US market, which put the headline and context in the same place.

Only 24% of chef positions in US are occupied by women.That’s why the BK Foundation launched a culinary scholarship program to bring more women to leadership positions in the industry.Women belong in the kitchen if they want to work there. And hopefully in leadership roles. pic.twitter.com/ITwnTJQpDp
– Fer Machado (@ fer_machado123) March 8, 2021
“Only 24% of chef positions in the US are held by women.
That is why the BK Foundation launched a culinary scholarship program to bring more women to leadership positions in the industry.
Women belong to the kitchen if they want to work there. And hopefully in leadership roles, ”reads the message from Fer Machado, global marketing director for Restaurant Brand International (parent company of Burger King, Popeyes and Tim Hortons).
Machado told Fast Company that it is difficult for the brand to apologize “because the whole message was actually published.”
The executive also explained that they were discussing it, but that it is “a real shame it gets lost in the UK conversation. In the end, the intention behind what we are doing here is really good. And all of this is more than an ‘ad’ or a ‘tweet’ ”.
On the other hand, he added that they analyze their messages very well before launching them in different media and countries so that the intention is reflected in the best way, although they are always learning and trying to do better.
Delete that immediately
KFC Gaming responded to the hamburger brand with an image, which shows the pixelated face of a Colonel Sanders edited on a body pointing to a blackboard that says: “the best time to delete this post was immediately after it was done. The second best moment is now”.

pic.twitter.com/QmJiwOGgZZ
– KFC Gaming (@kfcgaming)March 8, 2021
To which Burger King replied: Why would we delete a tweet that is drawing attention to a major lack of female representation in our industry, we think you would agree with this too? We have launched a scholarship to help more of our female employees have the opportunity to pursue culinary careers.

Why would we delete a tweet that’s drawing attention to a huge lack of female representation in our industry, we thought you’d be on board with this as well? We’ve launched a scholarship to help give more of our female employees the chance to pursue a culinary career.
– Burger King (@BurgerKingUK) March 8, 2021
To the response of the hamburger restaurant to KFC Gaming another user placed: “I don’t know, probably because you are attracting and validating conspiracy theorists of the sexist right …”, referring to another series of messages from users that validated the position of the first Tweet.

idk probably because you’re attracting and validating sexist right-wing conspiracy theorists lol. but enjoy your free publicity I guess, BurgerKingUK pic.twitter.com/GU0wxSsirO
– Tab (@tab_gohome) March 8, 2021
So far there has been no public apology or other manifestation of the fast food brand.

Meet 30 Inspirational Women This Women’s History Month

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Today marks International Women’s Day, a day for celebrating women and their achievements around the world. As part of this below are 30 women from various walks of life such as finance, tech, and sports who have achieved great things and continue to break boundaries both in and out of work.

Roni Savage
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Roni Savage
Savage is a chartered engineer who is the Managing Director & Founder of Jomas Associates, an engineering & environment company serving the construction industry since 2009. Additionally Savage is extremely passionate about gender diversity and social mobility, volunteering her time to mentor and coach others.

Ann Cairns
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Ann Cairns
Cairns is the Executive Vice Chair for Mastercard, she represents the company around the world focusing on inclusion, diversity and innovation. She is also global chair of the 30% Club and the chair of the Financial Alliance for Women, working to combat gender and race inequality at board and senior management levels. 

Grace Ukwuenyi
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Grace Ukwuenyi
Ukwuenyi was the first Black woman to cover European Asset managers for FX at Barclays . She now leads Sub-Saharan African sales coverage for a large European lender. Additionally, she previously founded an award-winning lifestyle app

Kamelia Aryafar
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Kamelia Aryafar
Aryafar is a technology and AI executive at Google focusing on Retail solutions. Prior to Google Aryafar has served as the EVP, Chief Analytics and Algorithms officer and board member for Overstock.com. Kamelia holds a Ph.D. in Computer Science from Drexel University and is passionate about Artificial intelligence and emotional health in young adults

Grace Ladoja
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Grace Ladoja, MBE
Ladoja is the founder of Metallic Inc, a global culture studio that joins the dots between culture, music and brands for the audiences who lead the zeitgeist. She is also the founder of ‘Homecoming’ an annual festival and ‘cultural exchange between Africa and the world’ spotlighting and nurturing rising creative talent in music, fashion, sport and art.

Sumit Chauhan
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Sumit Chauhan
Chauhan is an engineering executive at Microsoft, she heads up the engineering for the Canvas organization in OXO which includes Word and PowerPoint across mobile, web and desktop. Chauhan is also an avid supporter of API Chaya – a grassroots organization that provides support to people who have experienced domestic violence, human trafficking and exploitation.

Aishatu Ahmad
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Aishatu Ahmad
Suleiman is a Northern Nigerian female polo player, photographer, and entrepreneur. She is one of the very few black female polo players in the world and the only female polo player from the Northern Nigeria

Kihmberlie Douglas
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Kihmberlie Douglas
Douglas is a creative who since 2017 has been conceptualizing concepts, building sets, modeling, and photographing herself in editorial looks. She’s inspired many creators to “work with what they have” no matter their resources.

Tiimnit Gebru
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Timnit Gebru
Timnit Gebru is a computer scientist who works on algorithmic bias and data mining. She is an advocate for diversity in technology and co-founder of Black in AI, a community of black researchers working in artificial intelligence.

Zeze Millz
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Zeze Millz
Millz is a cultural commentator. Her eponymous self-titled weekly YouTube series, The Zeze Millz Show, sees her interview various popular and infamous personalities, notching up hundreds of thousands of views per video. She has recently been signed to record label Since ’93 – joining the likes of Wiz Kid, Krept & Konan, Naughty Boy and Loski.

Pippa Lamb
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Pippa Lamb
Lamb is an angel investor and Partner at Sweet Capital. She focuses on consumer software, with a particular interest in consumer internet, fintech and next generation social communities. Lamb is passionate about creating more diversity in venture capital and technology. Her angel investments include Clubhouse, Joro and The Stack

Asisat Oshoala
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Asisat Oshoala
Oshoala is a Nigerian professional footballer who plays for Spanish side FC Barcelona Femeni and she is the current holder of the African women’s player of the year award.

Jackie Park
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Jackie Park
Park is the US Co-Managing Partner of international law firm DLA Piper. She started her career in the mid-eighties as the only Asian American associate at a law firm and has risen to become one of the first Asian American women to be a partner in a big law firm.

Negar Mortazavi
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Negar Mortazavi
Mortazavi is an Iranian-American journalist and political analyst based in Washington. She has been covering Iranian affairs and US-Iran relations for over a decade. She is a columnist for The Independent and host of the Iran Podcast. She is a frequent media analyst on Iran and has appeared on CNN, MSNBC, NPR, BBC, France24, Aljazeera, and other media outlets in China, Turkey, and Israel.

Moe Odele
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Moe Odele
Odele is an international finance attorney, angel investor and Founder of  Vazi Legal – a US and Nigeria-based technology law firm. She is also founder of Scale My Hustle – a social enterprise that helps entrepreneurs build better-structured businesses by providing educational content and a community spread across 23+ countries on the continent and in the diaspora.

Lola Ogunkoya
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Lola Ogunkoya
Ogunkoya is a Vice President at JP Morgan covering clients globally in Equities sales-trading. She is also the founder of Black Women in Finance (BWIF) a global network with 400+ members that serves as a platform to not only connect talented women, but support them personally and professionally.

Sarafina El-Badry Nance
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Sarafina El-Badry Nance
El-Badry Nance is an Egyptian-American astrophysicist, science communicator, & women’s health advocate. She hosts the astronomy TV show Constellations (on all Seeker platforms), author of forthcoming children’s book Little Leonardo’s Fascinating World of Astronomy (August 2021), and shares her breast cancer prevention story publicly to empower others to face their health risks. 

Opeyemi Sofoluke
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Opeyemi Sofoluke
Sofoluke is the EMEA Lead for Global Technology, Diversity and Inclusion (D&I) at J.P. Morgan. In her role, she is responsible for designing and executing the overall Technology D&I agenda across an organisation of 5.5K technologists. Additionally, She is also the co-author of Twice As Hard, a business book being released in June 2021 exploring Black identity in the workplace. 

Sally Suleiman
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Sally Suleiman
Sally Suleiman is a Humanitarian, Strategist, Influencer, Motivator and Writer. She is the Founder of “The Isolycia Foundation”, an NGO that focuses on Education for children in rural areas in Nigeria

Kirsten Simmons
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Kirsten Simmons
Kirsten Simmons is an NBA-certified Agent working at Quartexx Basketball. Based in Toronto, Canada, she has spent several years supporting players all over the globe. Kirsten prides herself on the relationships she has built with clients, coaches and front-office personnel worldwide. 

Corinne Nevinny
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Corinne Nevinny
Corinne Nevinny is a pioneering female C-Suite executive. She is is one of the 12% of decision-making venture capitalists who are female; she invests as part of both Astia Angels and as co-founder and general partner of Avestria Ventures, both of which focus on funding female entrepreneurs. Previous roles include CFO of Edwards Lifesciences.

Nicky Bamgbade
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Nicky Bamgbade
Bamgbade is a confidence coach who works with mums to develop healthy habits and routines. Through her platform she has worked with women dealing with depression, post natal problems as well as mothers who have kids and need help and encouragement. She is a digital ambassador for for All Bright as well as being a contributor and talent spotter for Women’s Health magazine. 

Kazvare
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Kazvare
Kazvare is a writer, illustrator and graphic designer who is forging a name for herself with her often ‘sassy sketches and searing satire’ (GRAZIA). Her work has been featured in VOGUE (UK and Japan) and she has also collaborated with major brands such as Adidas and Facebook and held a pop-up exhibition at the Tate Modern.

Shweta Chauhan
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Shweta Chauhan
Chauhan is the first female Stake Pool Operator on Cardano. She is the CEO of kBlocks Stake Pool and is the Co-founder of Lovelace Academy. Her aim is to educate and empower women by teaching them how to code on blockchain technology. She is achieving this through Lovelace Academy, a platform co-founded by her specifically to teach “How to build Smart Contracts on Blockchain”.

Sandra Igwe
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Sandra Igwe
Igwe is a maternal health advocate, inclusion consultant, co-chair of the U.K. National inquiry into Racial injustice in Maternity Care and is the Founder of The Motherhood Group, a social enterprise that delivers workshops and large scale events interacting with thousands of black mothers.

Nicola Lamb
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Nicola Lamb
Lamb is a pastry chef and the author of Kitchen Projects, a newsletter and journal that offers readers a look behind the scenes on the highs and lows of recipe development. In 2020 Lamb co-founded Puff the Bakery, heralded by Vogue Magazine as a “cult bakery pop-up” that later transformed into a virtual pastry school with over 2,000 students during lockdown. 

Nayamka Roberts-Smith
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Nayamka Roberts-Smith
Award-winning esthetician  Roberts-Smith  educates her audience of nearly 1 million with a playful delivery of scientific skincare information that makes learning fun. After closing her six-figure spa studio in Beverly Hills due to COVID-19, she pivoted to create a six-figure e-commerce business as well as brought in six-figures in brand partnerships.

Jess Davis
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Jess Davis
Davis  is the Manager of Youth Basketball Operations for the Cleveland Cavaliers. She is also the Founder/CEO of GameHer, a gaming company started in 2013 to unite & connect women in gaming around the world, while also providing merchandise to make women feel empowered and proud of their lifestyle. You can find out more on www.gameher.com. 

Dr Amina Ibrahim
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Amina Ibrahim, MBE
Ibrahim has trained over 2,500 people to aid those who are victims to either knife crime or acid attacks. She has done this in addition to a significant amount of work around the world working with inner city youth.

Yamini Rangan
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Yamini Rangan
Rangan is Chief Customer Officer at HubSpot, overseeing the marketing, sales, and services teams. In a career spanning over 24 years she has held a number of senior roles at firms including Dropbox, Workday and SAP.

This article is part of a series featuring underrepresented people making a difference. To submit ideas for features or keep up to date with new releases you can find me on Twitter – @TommyASC91.

Zapier’s CEO Reveals How His Automation Startup Reached A $5 Billion Valuation Without Jumping On The VC ‘Hamster Wheel’

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Zapier cofounders Mike Knoop (left), Bryan Helmig (center) and CEO Wade Foster (right) didn’t … [+] participate in a recent secondary sale.
Zapier
Zapier CEO Wade Foster avoids thinking about fundraising as much as possible. Profitable for years, his startup, which provides automation tools that connect apps together, gets plenty of interest from venture capitalists. Foster prefers thinking about his customers, he says: museum tour guides, Etsy sellers and coffee shop owners who don’t have time to follow the latest buzzword on tech twitter, or whom VCs have anointed the next big thing.
“If you interviewed them and said, ‘do you think you’re a no code expert,’” says Foster, invoking one such funding magnet term, no code software, “they would probably be like, ‘I don’t know what you’re talking about.’”
But just because Zapier hasn’t played the game — raising just $1.3 million in funding, going fully remote long before the pandemic made it commonplace, and targeting a customer set left overlooked by many software companies — doesn’t mean it hasn’t built a big business. Last summer, Zapier reached $100 million in annualized recurring revenue; it’s passed $140 million by now. And in January, investors found a way into the business, just not through Foster. Sequoia and Steadfast Financial bought shares at a $5 billion valuation from some of Zapier’s original investors.

Rumor of that round was first reported by The Information in January. Details of the raise were first reported in Forbes’ Midas Touch newsletter on Sunday.
Speaking about it for the first time, Foster says the transaction took some pressure off the company founded in 2012 to pursue a liquidity-creating event like an IPO or sale just yet. (The amount sold and sellers were not disclosed; Bessemer Venture Partners, Threshold, Salesforce Ventures and Missouri-based Permanent Equity, where Foster is from and recently moved back, had numbered among its original shareholders, according to PitchBook.) None of the founders in the company participated in the sale, Fosters says: “I personally believe a lot in what we’re doing, there’s no other thing I could do with this money. If I were to take money out, the first thing I would do is find more Zapier shares.”

With more than 300 app partners and connecting to 3,000+ apps, Zapier’s charted a different growth trajectory than the typical software unicorn. One example: customer support. A team of about 100 employees well-versed in a range of work apps work closely with Zapier’s small customers to make sure everything’s running correctly — an unusually big commitment for a company of Zapier’s size, or customer of its typical contracts, which starts free and runs up to $599 per month for the full bells and whistles like live support, still a far cry from software licenses that can run into the millions for large businesses. (Foster says that while teams within large companies now make up about 25% of revenue, most customers pay $19.99 or $49 per month.)
Zapier also set up a $1 million small business assistance fund for struggling customers a year ago as the pandemic spread. Foster predicts that coming out of Covid-19, a new wave of mom-and-pop style small businesses of $5 million to $10 million in revenues will flourish having made the digital jump.
Zapier’s hiring and expanding software tools are also a rarity in that they’re fueled entirely by the company’s sales. Employees are eligible to receive bonuses from the company’s profits should they hit certain milestones twice a year. “We’ve never felt like our balance sheet has been the thing that was holding us back from reaching our goal,” says Foster. The company announced its first acquisition, of a no-code education business called Makerpad, on Monday.
Now with Sequoia and Steadfast on board, Foster plans to take advantage of some of those firms’ networks and support for portfolio companies, even if he spent years politely turning aside investors like Andrew Reed and Karan Mehandru, the lead partners for each who bought up shares in this raise. Asked if he’d consider a primary funding round or even an eventual IPO, Foster says “never say never.”
“For us, we’ve always looked at financing events, whether they’re primary, secondary or public markets, as a tool in the tool belt. It’s something that you can reach for as a person who runs a business that can help you when you need it,” says Foster. “I think that’s a much healthier approach to things than sort of getting on a hamster wheel that is difficult to get off.”

The bad streak continues for Tesla and Elon Musk: the tycoon lost 27,000 million dollars in a week

Following Tesla’s stock crash, Elon Musk’s fortune has plummeted, widening the gap between SpaceX CEO and Amazon’s Jeff Bezos.
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March 8, 2021 3 min read

This article was translated from our Spanish edition using AI technologies. Errors may exist due to this process.

A few days ago, Elon Musk fell from second to third place in the Forbes billionaires ranking. Today there is no good news for the tycoon either. The sharp collapse in Tesla shares reduced the assets of its CEO, who lost nearly $ 27 billion in just one week.
Tesla’s stock price has plummeted for four days in a row. That’s partly due to a sell off of tech stocks, and also a drop in the value of Bitcoin .
The electric car company invested $ 1.5 billion in Bitcoin on February 8. The transaction was key to raising the price of said cryptocurrency to a new all-time high , exceeding $ 50,000 per unit . However, shortly after it plummeted to $ 45,000 , which translated into losses for Tesla.
In 2020 , Elon Musk broke a record for generating the most wealth in the shortest span in history. The pandemic bonanza made him the richest person in the world for a time, before Jeff Bezos got over it again.
Since then, the CEOs of Tesla and that of Amazon have taken over the top two positions in the Forbes billionaire rankings . Their fortunes were almost on par, registering not very significant variations.
Everything changed on March 5, when Musk fell to third position with a net worth of $ 150.9 billion . An important drop considering that Just last February 17 it was $ 191 billion .
Tesla’s losses in the last week total about $ 27 billion . This leaves Elon Musk with a fortune of $ 151.1 billion as of today, according to Forbes . That is, far from the $ 178.2 billion of Bezos, who remains in the first place.
Everything indicates that the loss has not changed Elon Musk’s plan to build the city of Starbase in Texas . Just a few hours ago he shared a photo from that place, accompanied by his partner, the singer Grimes , and their little son X AE A-Xii , 10 months old.

Starbase, Texas pic.twitter.com/mt4IpqqmjF
– Elon Musk (@elonmusk) March 8, 2021

5 Psychology-Backed Tips for Earning, and Keeping, a Prospect's Trust

March 8, 2021 5 min read
Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own.
A big part of closing a sale with a prospect is to get them to trust you. But for many, this is a process that is far easier said than done. After all, you have your own interests in mind when you are communicating with a prospect, and they know it.
Despite this, many salespeople can gain the trust of their prospects — and keep that trust — by becoming more of an advisor in the buying journey. The power of psychology plays a big role in that process.
1. Establish your genuine credibility
Like it or not, humans have a natural tendency to fear the unknown. This fear is believed to contribute to the hidden biases that result in racism. It can also disrupt the sales process because prospects fear the unknown outcomes of what happens after completing a sale (particularly in the business world).
To alleviate this fear, one of your first steps in gaining trust is to establish your brand’s credibility. Many influencers achieve this by establishing themselves as industry authorities, sharing helpful information and tips. This way, when they pitch an affiliate product or service, their followers are far more likely to be interested.
While you can certainly share relevant industry info through social media accounts or other platforms, sales professionals should take a more direct approach by providing hard data that proves their business gets desired results. Case studies serve as powerful social proof to establish your niche authority and success.
Related: 8 Ways to Establish Your Business Credibility
2. Demonstrate true empathy
The saying “cold, hard facts” reveals an important insight — namely, that facts are cold. They can be helpful, but they lack the warmth and connection that helps prospects feel at ease. This is where a successful salesperson leverages their empathetic abilities.
The American Psychological Association says that empathy is hard work because it is cognitively tasking. After all, true empathy requires asking questions that help uncover a prospect’s root problem, actively listening and attempting to place oneself in the prospect’s shoes.
Though this necessitates a more involved approach, empathy is what fosters a genuine connection. It helps you better understand your prospect so you can deliver solutions tailored to their actual needs. Few things will build trust faster than that.
3. Create win-win situations
Psychology describes four basic outcomes to any situation: win-lose, lose-win, lose-lose and win-win. Unsurprisingly, a win-win situation — in which both sides feel good about the outcome — is what will lead to a strong, lasting relationship.
The sales process can often feel like a win-win solution is impossible — but it can be achieved with a bit of outside-the-box thinking. A great example of this comes from ThrottleNet and its “Win-Win” sales call. The company actually offers its services for free for the first 30 days after an initial IT call, while also not charging any on-boarding fees — all without a contract. Even crazier, they’ll refund all unsatisfied customers $1,000 should they cancel within 30 days.
At first glance, this seems like a win for the customer and a major loss for the company, right?
But this is a situation that can easily turn into a win-win. The process on-boards prospects at a much higher rate, giving them a firsthand experience with the service they might not try otherwise. This makes them far more likely to convert into paying customers, resulting in more revenue for the brand.
4. Be consistent
Consistency is key to building trust in any relationship. As mentioned earlier, much of the fear a prospect experiences in the sales process comes because they don’t know what to expect. When you behave consistently over time, they become better able to predict your behavior.
This consistency in your interactions helps release oxytocin when they interact with you, which has been found to increase trust and reduce fear. The release of oxytocin can also help increase empathy, which further strengthens the relationship between you and your prospect.
Related: 5 Steps for Making Your Brand Identity More Consistent
5. Always follow through on your promises
Your work isn’t done after you close that initial sale. No matter what type of service your business provides, that service essentially will either fulfill or not fulfill the promises you made during the sales process.
In psychology, our ability (or lack thereof) to keep promises communicates how much we value the person we made that promise to. Even breaking a small promise can cause trust to dissipate. Over time, a series of broken promises will cause you to lose a prospect’s trust entirely — and that’s when they’ll go to one of your competitors instead.
No salesperson should think it’s okay to over-promise and under-deliver. This may help you get sales at first, but it won’t help you retain customers. Negative word of mouth will spread and you will find that no one trusts you. On the other hand, if you only make promises that your business can keep, you will satisfy your customers and lay the groundwork for a lasting relationship by fulfilling expectations.
Trust is (always) the answer
Success in the sales world is ultimately about fostering a quality relationship with your prospects — and every good relationship needs trust to thrive. By demonstrating that you can be a trustworthy resource during the sales process, and continuing to be reliable after the sale is closed, you won’t just earn trust. You’ll also earn your prospects’ business.

The United States Approves the First Digital Contraceptive

This application was developed by a German company and its launch is expected to take place this year in the American country.
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March 8, 2021 2 min read

This article was translated from our Spanish edition using AI technologies. Errors may exist due to this process.

A digital contraceptive? The United States Food and Drug Administration ( FDA ) authorized the first fully digital application to monitor fertility, called Clue Birth Control .
This application was developed by a German company and its launch is expected to take place this year in the United States (USA), according to information from TechCrunch . After its premiere in the USA, the next market in which it will be presented will be Europe, although for this they must also have the approval of the regulatory body.
How will this ‘digital contraceptive’ work?
This would not be the first platform that makes an ovulation forecast to control fertility, however, unlike other brands, it is the only company that is being billed “totally digital”.
Users will not have to record some of the body changes that other platforms call for, such as taking their temperature daily and checking their cervical fluid.
The application will only require women to record, on a regular basis, the start date of their period, and by calculating data through Bayesian statistics, the application will show the days of high and low probability of conception.
Effectiveness?
According to the company’s spokespersons, the app is 92% effective when users make mistakes or do not use it frequently and 97% effective when it is used correctly or “perfectly”.
They also clarify that the platform is suitable only for women between 18 and 45 years old with regular periods. Likewise, they recommend using this product within a stable relationship or with couples who are regularly tested for sexual diseases.

5 Pieces of Advice I Never Expected to Give to Entrepreneurs

A venture investor discusses getting blindsided, saying no, human connection and more.
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March 8, 2021 5 min read
Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own.
I believe in mentoring, and I enjoy the time with entrepreneurs in answering whatever questions they may have. When an entrepreneur asks, for example, “What do investors expect to see in due diligence?” it’s an opportunity to talk about contracts and cap tables, but also about integrity and transparency. When another entrepreneur wants to know the best way to build a trusting relationship with her board of directors, I talk about milestones, financials and how surprises are a terrible idea. 
These discussions are typical — all part of the time-tested process of de-risking a startup and raising capital to fund growth and sustainability. And then there is another category of advice that I’ve built up over the years — I call it advice I never expected to give.
1. You do have competition
If you think you don’t have competition, think again. With the power of the Internet and the availability of information and cloud computing, competitors may not necessarily be traditional. Still, I assure you, there are smart people out there thinking up solutions to win the hearts, minds and wallets of your current and future customers. Do you think that back in 2008, as Airbnb founders were selling cereal to fund their idea, that any strategic thinker in the traditional hotel industry was imagining how people’s extra rooms could become key assets that would help build a $4.7 billion nontraditional competitor? 
Related: Get to Know Your Competition
2. Never miss the chance to step on a rake
Do you ever have one of those days when you wake up, put your feet on the floor, and have the whole morning and afternoon planned — and then something happens that is so unexpected that it is as if you stepped on a rake and the handle hit you in the head. Welcome those “rake” moments, those times when you could not have possibly anticipated or planned for what occurred. You will have a headache, and you will also learn something you couldn’t have learned any other way.
3. Say yes until you can’t. Then say no
The minute you sign up your first customer, there will be sticky situations you must address. Successful customer partnerships are successful because a business genuinely cares about its customers. That means compromise and negotiation. 
There will always be the customer who wants special pricing and terms. Give something away, but know your limits. Driving revenue by selling more units below cost never works. Suppose your customer insists upon features that aren’t in your product plan. Will they help share the cost or sign a larger contract for a longer term? Consider all the options, but if re-prioritizing development adversely impacts other customers or your business plan, respectfully decline. Always understand your boundaries. Your responsibility is to your employees and your investors, as well as your customers.
Related: 7 Strategies to Succeed with that Demanding, Difficult Customer
4. Learn the lessons and mentality of the last mile
In shipping and delivery, “last mile” traditionally refers to the final leg of moving a product from a production facility through multiple distribution points to the doorstep of the actual customer. The “last mile” is often the most costly and logistically difficult step. Any business that moves goods understands that success is impossible without doing the last mile right.
Every startup has a last mile. There are critical final steps that deliver the experience your customers paid for and expect. Maybe it is the training that makes an online dashboard easy-to-use. Or it could be the navigation buttons on a patient’s telemedicine screen or the packaging of cold roasted coffee. In the physical delivery business, Amazon and others are road-testing driverless cars, robots and drones. What innovation can you bring to your company’s last mile?
Related: From Seed Stage to the Last Mile: All You Need to Know About Fund Raising for Startups
5. Remember the value of having a phone conversation
Texting and Slack are great tools. Digital communications have an immediacy and in-the-moment connection. Texts are all about efficiency and information. Emojis save words. Texts allow a person to multitask and ignore the background noise. 
Call me old-school, but I remember the AT&T tagline from the eighties: “Reach out and touch someone.” In today’s day and age with texting, Slack and other communications tools, it is essential to remember the value of having a phone conversation. 
Texting is a great way to receive transactional information. The benefits are enormous — efficiency and instantaneous access to another person virtually anywhere and anytime. Here’s what you miss: The opportunity to hear and react to the tone and inflection of the other person’s voice. The moment to declare out loud that you don’t understand — or that you do.
Nothing replaces human-to-human conversation for true collaboration and understanding. This is true for founders, managers and employees — especially now. 
The opportunity to coach and mentor entrepreneurs is one of the great rewards of being a venture investor. For me, the learning process is a two-way street. Sharing my experience with entrepreneurs has helped them make good decisions and overcome obstacles, while I have gained insights from their creativity and points of view.

Meghan Markle Told Oprah That Her First Job Was Working at a Frozen Yogurt Store, Humphrey Yogart, in L.A. When She Was 13

She met her idol Yasmine Bleeth, who starred as a lifeguard on ‘Baywatch,’ while working there. Her old boss said she was outgoing and popular with customers.
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March 8, 2021 3 min read
This story originally appeared on Business Insider
Meghan Markle’s first job was serving frozen yogurt at a store in LA when she was 13, she told Oprah Winfrey in an interview that aired on Sunday.
In the interview with Markle and her husband, Prince Harry, the Duchess of Sussex spoke about contemplating suicide after getting married, how members of the royal family had conversations about her son Archie’s skin tone, and how Kate Middleton made her cry before her wedding.
In another portion of the interview, Markle briefly mentioned the yogurt store she worked at in Sherman Oaks, California. 
Markle, who announced she was stepping back from the royal family with Harry in January 2020, told Winfrey: “My first job was when I was 13, at a frozen yogurt shop called Humphrey Yogart.”
“I’ve always worked. I’ve always valued independence,” she added.
She didn’t go into any further details in the interview. It’s unclear exactly when Meghan worked at Humphrey Yogart, but she would have been there sometime in 1994.
Markle’s employment at the shop was already known about. According to a report in The Guardian, when Markle was taking the bins out in the parking lot of the yogurt shop, she met her celebrity idol, Yasmine Bleeth, who starred as lifeguard Caroline Holden on “Baywatch.”
Markle blurted out “Oh my God, I loved you in that Soft & Dri commercial,” to which Bleeth answered, “Okay, thank you!,” The Mirror reported in 2017. 
Bleeth then asked for her name and shook her hand. Markle said: “That moment with Yasmine is exactly what I base every interaction with fans on,” per the Guardian.
Markle’s former boss Paula Sheftel told the Sunday Mirror that Markle didn’t earn much, but she was well-liked by the shop’s customers.
“She earned minimum wage and was very popular with customers. She had to prove she had an outgoing personality and would work well with staff,” Sheftel told the Mirror.
Markle has come a long way since then. After landing various small roles, including appearing as a suitcase girl on the game show “Deal or No Deal,” the actress got her big break on “Suits.” 
Markle married Harry on May 19, 2018 and they had their first child together one year later.
During the Sunday interview, the couple also announced that their second child, due this summer, would be a girl. They haven’t announced an expected due date.

Femtech: Going From Niche To Mainstream In 2021?

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Femtech within reach
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Female technologies catering to  women’s health and wellness  (more commonly known as “Femtech”) is hot, and it’s moving beyond the fertility tracking apps that defined the category in its early stages. The category now encompasses pregnancy and maternal care, sexual health, chronic disease, amongst others. “Menotech”-innovations to improve menopausal and perimenopausal lifestyles was identified by advertising agency Wunderman Thompson as a 2020 trend to watch. And the support of celebrities such as Gwyneth Paltrow has further raised visibility for this sector.
Despite the enthusiasm for this sector, the sector remains an undeveloped area of healthtech with only 4% of healthcare R&D going towards women’s health, according to TechCrunch.  Despite reports indicating the sector’s anticipated growth back in 2017, both funding numbers and proportion of total funding in Femtech has been on decline since then. According to analysis from Rock Health, Femtech funding declined to 3.3% in 2019. And while average deal size in Femtech grew between 2013 to 2018, it has held relatively constant during the past few years. 
The dearth of investment in femtech startups has been linked to the difficulty of getting capital to female entrepreneurs. Crunchbase figures show that in 2019, 2.8% of VC funding went to women-led startups; in 2020, that fell to 2.3%.   Furthermore, evidence suggests that female-led start-ups financed by all-male VC firms may drastically reduce the probability of a successful exit (either via acquisition or an IPO). The challenge is far from easy to solve. As Melinda Gates put it, “We like to think that venture capital is driven by the power of good ideas. But by the numbers, it’s men who have the keys”. Femtech founders, in particular, talk about war stories of how difficult it has been to convince male investors of women’s health needs.

What It Takes To Go Mainstream
1. Build a Pipeline of Femtech Entrepreneurs
The femtech industry consists of about 200 startups worldwide, of which 92% are founded and led by women, according to recent reports. Compared to the 12,000 fintech startups in operations today, femtech startups are still a small minority. Building a pipeline of potential femtech startups is a first step.  One way to help support and enable promising business ideas is through startup accelerators. 

A handful of accelerators dedicated to Femtech have been launched around the world during the past two years, all offering a combination of networking, mentoring, and introductions to potential investors. Examples include Station F in France and AXA Femtech Accelerator. And as of this week, femtech startups have an additional option to consider: the Tech4Eva accelerator in Switzerland. Launched by Swiss health insurer Groupe Mutuel in partnership with the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Tech4Eva aims to foster and support innovation in women’s health. Nicolas Loeillot, Chief Innovation Officer of Groupe Mutuel explains, “Prevention is the future of health insurance as it can significantly reduce health costs, which are becoming unbearable in Switzerland and elsewhere. If we improve women’s health, we have a positive impact on more than half of the Swiss population.”
2. Femtech as a viable investment opportunity
Pitchbook analysts have suggested  that investors have not been convinced of the category because of a lack of “sizable exits.” According to this analysis, only six femtech exists were completed in 2019, although this represented a 64% increase in value compared to 2018. With that said, Pitchbook also points to several fundraising deals that were completed in 2020, such as Maven Clinic’s $45M Series C funding, and Kindbody’s $32M Series B funding.  And as the VC world becomes more diverse and with the wide-spread recognition that preventive health and personalized medicine, analysts believe that VCs will see femtech as a viable market opportunity.
3. Enlarging the scope 
Another avenue to accelerate Femtech is to expand the current scope and to actively serve different subsegments of the female population. According to RockHealth, some spaces ripe for innovation include providing care for queer and transgender communities and sexual education for young women, particularly those of color.
Over half of LGBTQ+ identifying individuals report facing discrimination while seeking medical care, leading to greater care avoidance. Given that an increasing number of women are identifying as LGBTQ+ in the workplace, RockHealth suggests that there is an opportunity for Femtech companies to fill the gap and meet the needs of this community.
Another RockHealth proposal is to look at providing sexual education for adolescent and young women of color in the United States. Women of color are projected to be the largest demographic of US women by 2060. Given that disparities in sexual health education mainly impact women of color, there is a meaningful need for Femtech to work on closing this gap.
Femtech, while still an emergent sector, has potential to expand and grow in 2021. With half of the world’s population as its market, it’s about matching the right solution to the need and bringing it to scale.